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Discussion paper

The discussion paper brings together the latest on learning and skills for life, work and sustainable development

Key Issues/Strands

  • Foundational learning (from the lifelong learning perspective)
  • Skills for employment and entrepreneurship
  • Education for sustainable development incl. environmental education
Thematic Action Track 2 Learning and skills for life, work and sustainable development

Comments (64)

Piero Dominici
Piero Dominici

#Educating for the #Future …

“Healing the fracture between the Human and the Technological”**

#PeerReviewed

“The strategic role of #Education”

“The evolutionary process of the social ecosystems is advancing towards a redefinition of the relationships and asymmetries, bringing forth the need for a “new social contract”#quote

👉 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40309-017-0126-4 in EJFR,

💥🌎 And I share also…

🌎 “Education is a #HumanRight not a privilege!

“Education is not a privilege but - I would add - until now it has been. (Always taking care not to confuse 'education' and 'indoctrination') (quote)

💥”our educational systems have internalized a pseudo-scientific, zero-sum dogma that everything we learn, do, or learn to do must be useful in some way; must be measured, evaluated, & certified as something that will produce concrete results or provide economic returns”(quote)

💥I sincerely hope it will be of interest to you: this article takes up hypotheses and theses of work and research developed over the years, subjecting the educational models and paradigms that have become hegemonic in recent decades to a critique that is not simple and articulate.

💥 Paradigms that risk condemning us to inadequacy and cultural backwardness, also with reference to the so-called digital revolution. I have been and am among the very few scholars and researchers to support this - I still do - even at an international level. Happy reading and good research, with the wish for new scientific collaborations.

💥 Starting with my definition 'Democracy is complexity' (quote) which I proposed back in the mid-1990s.

🌎 “The weak link of democracy and the challenges of educating toward global citizenship. Prospects (2022). UNESCO

Here’s the link: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11125-022-09607-8#citeas

Education is a #HumanRight, not a privilege!

Springer Nature Group Education2030UN ➡️ Transforming Education
#SDG4 #TransformingEducation #TransformingEducationSummit #SkillsForLife #LifelongLearning #LetMeLearn #ParadigmShift #NewSocialContract #SDGs #EducatingForTheFuture #CriticalThinking #Complexity #SystemicVision #Transdisciplinarity #international #cooperation #networking

#PeerReviewed

An approach and research since 1995

🤝🌎🤝 Thank you all for the interesting contents and comments! I hope we can keep in touch for this and other important projects and actions with a global and inclusive perspective.

🌎📬 [email protected]
[email protected]

CHAOS, International Research and Education Programme
🌎🤝🌎 http://www.chaoshumanresearch.com/index.php

Piero Dominici
Piero Dominici

”From Below: Roots and Grassroots of Societal Transformation, The Social Construction of Change”, in CADMUS, 2021 #PeerReviewed
 
“That systemic change must begin from grassroots communities and single individuals and groups, and by definition can never be a top-down imposition, implicates a necessary rethinking of our educational institutions, which are still based on logics of separation and on “false dichotomies" (quote)
 
💥🌎http://cadmusjournal.org/article/volume-4/issue-5/essay5-social-constru…

#TransformingEducation #TransformingEducationSummit #LetMeLearn #RightToEducation #QualityEducation #SkillsForLife #GlobalCitizenship #SystemicChange #ComplexSystems #InclusiveInnovation

Thank you all for the interesting contents and comments! I hope we can keep in touch for this and other important projects and actions with a global perspective.

🌎📬👉 My email: [email protected]
[email protected]

Piero Dominici
Piero Dominici

#EducatingTowardsComplexity #EducatingTowardsUnpredictability (1995) #criticalthinking #SystemsThinking
#TES2022

#book #PeerReviewed #research #science #ComplexSystems #transdisciplinarity #ParadigmShift #TransformingEducation #complexity #international #cooperation

After the prestigious World Congress of the World Organisation of Systems and Cybernetics.…

All scientific publications are always a source of great satisfaction, even more so when they take place with colleagues from other scientific disciplines (in this book, the colleagues are all so-called hard scientists).

It is the greatest joy for me, but I believe for all those who study and, above all, do research and who, sometimes/often, come up against 'logics of separation and confinement of knowledge and skills' that openly hinder any multi/inter/transdisciplinarity, any dialogue between scientific-disciplinary sectors, and the systemic vision that we so desperately need.

Let me say: in that title, in those words, in that metaphor, are to be found more than twenty-five years of study and research, but also an approach and an epistemology, carried out with great passion and sacrifice (a wonderful sacrifice!) on these increasingly topical and strategically important issues.

I wish good work and good research to all!

To my Colleagues and Friends of the WOSC International Scientific Network, I say: it has been a great pleasure to confront, dialogue and cooperate. I look forward to new Congresses and international publications… together.

🌎👉 Dominici, P. (2022). “Beyond Black Swans. Managing Complexity: A Contradiction in Terms?” In: Perko, I., Espejo, R., Lepskiy, V., Novikov, D.A. (eds) World Organization of Systems and Cybernetics 18. Congress-WOSC2021. WOSC 2021. Lecture Notes in Networks and Systems, vol 495. Springer, Cham.

👉 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-08195-8_12

“Beyond Black Swans. Managing Complexity: A Contradiction in Terms?”

An approach and research paths since '95

#QuoteTheAuthors

World Organization of Systems and Cybernetics

#TransformingEducation #TransformingEducationSummit #LetMeLearn #RightToEducation #QualityEducation #SkillsForLife

Thank you all for the interesting contents and comments! I hope we can keep in touch for this and other important projects and actions with a global perspective.

🌎📬👉 My email: [email protected]
[email protected]

I take this opportunity to share some publications and scientific articles:

#TES2022 🌎 #SDG4 #SDGs

Piero Dominici
Piero Dominici

I would add: we need not to confuse education with indoctrination or the transmission of notions - as is unfortunately often the case.

👉 I have taken the same critical stance with regard to so-called 'digital education' and the whole issue that, for this hyper-technological civilisation, only 'digital skills' are needed: they are important, fundamental, but by pursuing only these goals we are off track as the recent pandemic has also shown us”

🌎👉We need a systemic vision and a renewed dialogue and contamination between knowledge and skills.

🌎 👉We do not need, indeed we must get rid of them as soon as possible, “old and new logics of separation and confinement of knowledge and skills”(quote).

“Educating for the Future in the Age of Obsolescence”

This article, was peer-reviewed and selected as one of the outstanding papers presented at the 2019 IEEE 18th International Conference ICCI*CC

👉 Link to Pdf: http://www.cadmusjournal.org/files/pdfreprints/vol4issue3/Educating-for…

👇👇👇

You can see also:

🍀”The Digital Mockingbird: Anthropological Transformation and the “New Nature”, in World Futures.The Journal of New Paradigm, Routhledge, Taylor & Francis, Feb. 2022.
 
#PeerReviewed Routhledge #research #transdisciplinarity #education #AI #FutureofEducation #ComplexSystems #EducationForAll #PeerReviewed
 
https://doi.org/10.1080/02604027.2022.2028539  

🌎 Pdf https://www.academia.edu/71030619/Research_Article_The_Digital_Mockingb…

🍀 ”La Gran Equivocación: Replantear la educación y la formación virtual para la “sociedad hipercompleja”, in “Comunicación y Hombre”.Número 18. Año 2022
👉
https://doi.org/10.32466/eufv-cyh.2022.18.701.23-38

👉 https://academia.edu/resource/work/71194859

#PeerReviewed

An approach and research since 1995

#TransformingEducation #TransformingEducationSummit #LetMeLearn #RightToEducation #QualityEducation #SkillsForLife

Thank you all for the interesting contents and comments! I (really) hope we can keep in touch for this and other important projects and actions with a global perspective.

🌎📬👉 My email: [email protected]
[email protected]

Piero Dominici
Piero Dominici

You can see also:

“The Digital Mockingbird: Anthropological Transformation and the “New Nature”, in World Futures.The Journal of New Paradigm, Routhledge, Taylor & Francis, Feb. 2022.
 
#PeerReviewed Routhledge #research #transdisciplinarity #education #AI #FutureofEducation #ComplexSystems #EducationForAll #PeerReviewed
 
💥👉 https://doi.org/10.1080/02604027.2022.2028539  

🌎 Pdf https://www.academia.edu/71030619/Research_Article_The_Digital_Mockingb…

#TransformingEducation #TransformingEducationSummit #LetMeLearn #RightToEducation #QualityEducation #SkillsForLife

Thank you all for the interesting contents and comments! I hope we can keep in touch for this and other important projects and actions with a global perspective.

🌎📬👉 My email: [email protected]
[email protected]

Piero Dominici
Piero Dominici

I share with (great) pleasure…

It is always a good feeling when one of your original papers, the result of much study and research activity, as well as continuous attendance at working groups and international conferences, is published. After a long processing time and an equally long time for referencing and formatting, this (umpteenth) scientific article has finally been published in the prestigious Springer Nature scientific journal Prospects - UNESCO

I sincerely hope it will be of interest to you: this article takes up hypotheses and theses of work and research developed over the years, subjecting the educational models and paradigms that have become hegemonic in recent decades to a critique that is not simple and articulate.

Paradigms that risk condemning us to inadequacy and cultural backwardness, also with reference to the so-called digital revolution. I have been and am among the very few scholars and researchers to support this - I still do - even at an international level. Happy reading and good research, with the wish for new scientific collaborations.

Starting with my definition 'Democracy is complexity' (quote) which I proposed back in the mid-1990s.

🌎 “The weak link of democracy and the challenges of educating toward global citizenship. Prospects (2022). UNESCO

Here’s the link: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11125-022-09607-8#citeas

Springer Nature - #PeerReviewed

👉 https://doi.org/10.1007/s11125-022-09607-8

Abstract

Before discussing the prospects for educating young people toward becoming global citizens, we must ask ourselves: is global citizenship reality or illusion? What can be stated is that plain citizenship itself can no longer be considered merely a legal or judicial question. Today, citizenship is only partially linked to rights and duties deriving from the recognition of an individual as belonging to a community (local, national or international). Future citizens of the digitally hyper-connected global village face two dangers: simulation of participation and the illusion of having a less asymmetrical relationship to power.

The rules of engagement are not being written by legislators but by agencies producing and sharing knowledge; citizenship (global or otherwise) is intimately correlated with access to quality education.

👉💥Three concepts form the basis for educating toward global citizenship:

- awareness that citizenship and education are inseparable,
- awareness that democracy and education are inseparable, and
- awareness that democracy is complexity.

🌎 Global citizenship: Reality or illusion?

👉DOI: 10.1007/s11125-022-09607-8 (to be continued)

An approach and research since 1995

#TransformingEducation #SystemicChange #GlobalCitizenship #WeakLinkOfDemocracy #SimulationOfParticipation #QualityEducation #inclusion #FutureOfEducation #Schools #LifelongLearning #University #ParadigmShift #ComplexSystems #NewSocialContract #SDGs #SDG4 #TES2022 #WAAS #WCSA #UNESCO #CHAOS_International_Project #TransformingEducationSummit #LetMeLearn #RightToEducation

Stefan Pasti
Stefan Pasti

Greetings and Best Wishes to All,

We have a Climate Emergency, Eco-Restoration Emergency, and, in my view, a Moral Compass Emergency.

Education, especially at the higher education level, but throughout our cultures and societies, needs to be very focused on identifying and actualizing solutions.

I include as an attachment a summary document for The Community Peacebuilding and Cultural Sustainability (CPCS) Initiative: "Triggering Positive Social, Environmental, Economic, and Cultural Tipping Points" (10 pages).

As I say in my profile--

I am a Researcher (risk assessment, solution pathways, local collaborative problem solving); Peacebuilder (approach); community organizer (actualize and maximize potential for solutions);

My Focus--especially hoping to catalyze potential at higher education institutions for carrying out local Community Visioning (collaborative problem solving); training facilitators for such; "Triggering Positive Social, Environmental, Economic, and Cultural Tipping Points" (10 Pages; September, 2022)(Summary document) accessible in Twitter profile, and featured on homepage of www.cpcsi.org;--and potential at higher education institutions for training many civilian climate corps (in accordance with primary approach, below)

Primary approach (in detail in above mentioned document)
1) Leverage 5-10 page overviews on how-to Zero Carbon ASAP, Eco-Restoration, and etc. from 1000s of *positive tipping points organizations and institutions* = clearinghouse
2) Clearinghouse as input to inform surveys of key local leaders (in communities around the world)--on local specific challenges, and local specific solutions
3) Surveys--with assistance from local educators, activists, media, etc--can catalyze Community Visioning (collaborative problem solving), and Neighborhood Learning Centers, and help identify workshops needed in Neighborhood Learning Centers

Community Visioning can be defined as a series of community meetings designed to maximize citizen and resident participation in identifying challenges and solutions, and actualizing solutions.

Here are some example categories of positive tipping point organizations and institutions:

1. Alleviating Water Issues; Alleviating Hunger; Alleviating Poverty 2. Climate Finance; Green Finance 3. Climate Mitigation/Sustainability--Business/Commerce Related 4. Climate Mitigation--News, Analysis 5. Climate Mitigation--Research; Education; Action 6. Crowdfunding 7. Elder Care 8. Emergency Humanitarian Response 9. Environment; Sustainability; Protecting Biodiversity 10. Green Party 11. Health Care 12. Housing/Shelter Assistance 13. Human Rights 14. Indigenous People; Native People; First Nations 15. Impact Investing; Socially Responsible Investing 16. International Financial Institutions 17. Journalism, News Sources 18. Land Rights 19. Local Economies; Local Currency 20. Peacebuilding 21. Philanthropy 22. Publishers, Sustainability 23. Questionnaires and Surveys 24. Religious; Spiritual; Interfaith 25. Stakeholder Engagement 26. Sustainable Communities; Ecovillages; Permaculture 27. Sustainable Food Systems 28. United Nations Organizations 29. Universities, Colleges; Education 30. Women’s Organizations

And here are some example positive tipping point organizations and institutions, which correspond to the list above--

Example Organizations, Institutions correspond to categories above

1. The Hunger Project; InterAction
2. Ceres; Green Bank Network
3. CDPGlobal
4. Covering Climate Now
5. 350.org; Climate Reality; ICLEI; Fridays for Future
6. Kickstarter
7. AARP
8. Red Cross
9. IUCN; IPBES; Footprint Network
10. Bundnis90/Die Grunen
11. World Health Organization
12. Habitat for Humanity
13. Human Rights Watch
14. Cultural Survival
15. Global Impact Investing Network
16. World Bank
17. Global Editors Network
18. Landesa
19. Bristol Pound
20. Search for Common Ground
21. Global Impact Investing Network
22. New Society Publishers
23. Pew Research Global
24. Religions for Peace
25. Engagement Hub
26. Microgrid Knowledge; Global Ecovillage Network; Permies.com; Solar Cookers Intl
27. CGIAR; IFPRI; World Farmers’ Organisation; Food Tank
28. UNHCR; WFP; UNEP; SDSN; UNITAR
29. International Universities Climate Alliance; Eco-Schools Global
30. Global Fund for Women

Even one (1) university could initiate the call for the 5-10 page overviews, and build the clearinghouse. I believe there are survey designers, educators, activists, and local news providers who would be more than ready to make use of such excellent organizing material to catalyze local collaborative problem solving.

I invite questions, comments, recommendations, and suggestions.

For a Peaceful and Sustainable World,

Stefan Pasti
The Community Peacebuilding and Cultural Sustainability (CPCS) Initiative
www.cpcsi.org

Piero Dominici
Piero Dominici

#TransformingEducation #TransformingEducationSummit #LetMeLearn #RightToEducation #QualityEducation #SkillsForLife

Thank you all for the interesting contents and comments! I hope we can keep in touch for this and other important projects and actions with a global perspective.

🌎📬👉 My email: [email protected]
[email protected]

I take this opportunity to share some publications and scientific articles:

#TES2022 🌎 #SDG4 #SDGs

Here we go...💥

And, on this occasion, I (again) share…

I share some excerpts…

“For many years, while respecting everyone's visions/opinions, I have always been one of the very few critics (both in popular and scientific publications), I have always seen and defined STEM Paradigm as the “new reductionist paradigm” (a hegemonic paradigm, nowadays, also because of the many interests at stake); in fact, I have always spoken of it in terms of the 'STEM doctrine'; (Please…#QuotetheAuthors)

it is part of the overall vision that aims to build democracies (?) dominated by technocracy and hyper-specialised technocrats. Scientific and technological education is essential, but it is not sufficient for what I have called a 'hyper-complex society'.

🌎👉 I would add: we need not to confuse education with indoctrination or the transmission of notions - as is unfortunately often the case.

👉 I have taken the same critical stance with regard to so-called 'digital education' and the whole issue that, for this hyper-technological civilisation, only 'digital skills' are needed: they are important, fundamental, but by pursuing only these goals we are off track as the recent pandemic has also shown us”

🌎👉We need a systemic vision and a renewed dialogue and contamination between knowledge and skills.

🌎 👉We do not need, indeed we must get rid of them as soon as possible, “old and new logics of separation and confinement of knowledge and skills”(quote).

“The great mistake, the overturn, and the need for hybrid figures**”

The biggest danger we are facing is due to the fact that we have given carte blanche to technology, in the mistaken belief that technology (in particular, the web) can solve any problem, including the capacity to bring politics and citizens back together. The “great mistake” (Dominici, 1996) being made by the hypertechnological civilization today, in fact, is precisely that of believing that education and culture (in particular, digital education and digital culture(s) can be solved by delegating everything to technical competence, speed, and simulation, to the “new” technologies of connection and the new ecosystems of communication, and hence that the kind of education and/or training that is needed today is purely technical and/or technological, solely a problem of “skills” and “know-how” and nothing more, which is the exact opposite of what we so desperately need. This kind of mentality will continue to reinforce the dramatic fracture that has separated studies in the humanities from studies in scientific fields, whereas the figures we need in order to educate for a global future are hybrid figures (Dominici, 1996, 2018, 2020).

Hybrid figures** who are aware of and open to the contamination among fields of knowledge and skills, hybrid figures who have completed educational itineraries based on interdisciplinarity and multidisciplinarity, designed to shape critical and elastic minds at every level, hybrid figures who are capable of recognizing complexity and connections, of evaluating the open architecture(s) of reality, and of perceiving limits and borders as opportunities for growth and experimentation.

Although today everyone is talking about contamination, hybridization, and elastic minds, at this point, it needs to be underlined that the concept of hybrid figures, developed by this author through years of study and research, is diametrically opposed to the hegemonic paradigms currently espoused in most spheres of higher education, supported in this delicate phase of transition by the media and the global system of communication, and generously funded by corporations and industries.

These paradigms, which call for the “hybridization of knowledge” (as defined by enlightened minds at MIT and other great American universities, technological institutions, and centers) propose a required base in information technology for degrees in all disciplines as the fundamental basis for life and work in tomorrow’s world. It is difficult to deny that the MIT model is founded on a deterministic, reductionist vision of education (Figure 1). Based on AI, programming, automation, and simulation, with lip service to the humanities, it offers a “technological innovation without culture” (Dominici, 2003). It is similar to what is known as the STEM doctrine, which dictates that the main focus of education should be on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (hence the acronym from the initials of these four words).

This technocratic vision of society, based exclusively on science, technique, and progress, is part of the abovementioned “great mistake” and can lead nowhere else but to a neo-positivistic dystopia. Of course, it is the European Commission itself that recommends guidelines founded on information technology, digital education, and hyper-specialized technicians, where citizenship is only an issue of digital citizenship. Where only skills—above all digital skills—without knowledge, without awareness of epistemological premises, and completely lacking a “culture of complexity” are to be taught; what counts for the European Commission, apparently, is only computational thinking, in which the focus is on “how to” but never “why”).

[…]

Therefore, among the preconditions of a new humanism is the recovery of the complex dimensions of educational complexity: “healing the fracture” between the human and the technological; rethinking the complex interaction/synthesis between natural and artificial; and rethinking educational processes from a necessarily systemic, socio-emotional perspective. Another is the construction of a “culture of error” (Dominici, 1996-2017c), teaching unpredictability and fostering the awareness that this is the fundamental element of our being human, not only of complex systems.

Likewise, awareness of our incompleteness, of our limits and vulnerabilities—even in the framework of a renewed complex synthesis with technique/technology—to help support our fragilities and inadequacies and rediscover a humanism that has been purged of the ideology that saw the environment and ecosystems as mere instruments at our disposal is thus fundamental.
Far from being a consequence of the kind of healing unity being advocated, however, is the gradual drifting we are witnessing in our modern times toward a dismal flattening-out of controversy, an artificial reduction of debate and dissent, due to an almost pathological fear of any kind of conflict, which seems to be spreading further and further every day. But without conflict, criticism, disagreement, and debate, there can be no educational process; no achievement of critical thinking; and above all, no democracy, global or otherwise.

Democracy, it should be obvious at this point, is complexity (Dominici, 1996). It can never be standardization, hetero-direction (Riesman, 1948), or conformism to a dominant point of view or narrative, however desirable or rational the latter may appear. It should be added here that another illusion that is wreaking damage on our society today is the ingenuous belief that more information, more connections, more and faster digital networks in this age of access / knowledge society (Benkler, 2006; Hess & Ostrom, 2007; Himanen, 2001; Rifkin, 2000) make our decisions and our procedures more rational. Yet all of this is nothing more than an example of limited rationality (Simon, 1947, 1959, 1962, 1997).

Conflict and debate, when undertaken with respect for the opinions of others, are the very basis of that kind of education, based on the understanding of the value of error and doubt, that form creative and analytical minds, and should be carried out without forgetting that uncertainty is the underlying condition of human life, practicing an “epistemology of uncertainty” (Morin, 1973, 1980, 1986, 1991, 2001, 2004). We may strive to limit uncertainty as much as possible, but it will always be present, and at the end of the day, cohabitation with uncertainty is inevitable: “Uncertainty is the natural habitat of human life—although it is the hope of escaping uncertainty that is the engine of human pursuits.” (Bauman, 2008, p. 14 of introduction).

What is called for, in order to incorporate uncertainty and complexity into a new approach on the part of both citizenship and governance, based on “systems thinking”, are long-term policies in which plain citizens, educators, managers, and political decision makers can learn to cope with the unexpected, rather than recurring to ad hoc reactions and measures taken when emergencies loom. This kind of behavior amounts to a “culture of emergency” (Dominici, 2003), in which authorities and experts limit themselves to repeating slogans rather than actuating strategies- and to simply playing things by ear in an erratic and irrational manner, treating events as though they were simply occasional “black swans” rather than intrinsic aspects of the complexity of our ecosystem. Never has it become clearer how unprepared we are for coping with emergency; never have our inadequacies and superficial short-term politics been more obvious than in the face of a global emergency, such as the 2020 appearance of the Covid-19 pandemic, during which severely underfunded/defunded healthcare systems, media coverage based on fear rather than logic and reassurance, and an extremely punitive form of moral blame placed squarely and exclusively on the shoulders of the citizens brutally revealed the lack of systems thinking and coordination of our global civilization.

The result has been a series of emergency measures, many of which were enacted without compensation or consideration in terms of economic suffering and cognitive/psychological distress, leading to a decline in solidarity, cooperation, and reunselfishness on the part of citizens. And once again, digital technology has been proposed as the exclusive means by which all problems will be “virtually” solved, through a magical process of simplification” (to be continued”

🌎👉 Dominici, P. “The weak link of democracy and the challenges of educating toward global citizenship”. Prospects (2022). UNESCO

Here’s the link: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11125-022-09607-8#citeas

Springer Nature - #PeerReviewed

👉 https://doi.org/10.1007/s11125-022-09607-8

🌎💥 You can see also:

👉 The Digital Mockingbird: Anthropological Transformation and the “New Nature”, in World Futures.The Journal of New Paradigm, Routhledge, Taylor & Francis, Feb. 2022.
 
#PeerReviewed Routhledge #research #transdisciplinarity #education #AI #FutureofEducation #ComplexSystems #EducationForAll #PeerReviewed
 
https://doi.org/10.1080/02604027.2022.2028539  

🌎 Pdf https://www.academia.edu/71030619/Research_Article_The_Digital_Mockingb…

👉”La Gran Equivocación: Replantear la educación y la formación virtual para la “sociedad hipercompleja”, in “Comunicación y Hombre”.Número 18. Año 2022
👉
https://doi.org/10.32466/eufv-cyh.2022.18.701.23-38

👉 https://academia.edu/resource/work/71194859

#PeerReviewed

🌎👉 “Beyond the Darkness of our Age. For a Non-Mechanistic View of Complex Organization as Living Organisms” in RTSA

👉 http://rtsa.eu/RTSA_2_2022_Dominici.pdf?fs=e&s=cl #PeerReviewed

(To be continued) SEE BELOW…

An approach and research since 1995

#QuotetheAuthors #FutureOfEducation #ParadigmShift #TransformingEducation #transdisciplinarity #TransformingEducationSummit #NewSocialContract #SDGs #SDG4 #RightToEducation #citizenship #democracy #RethinkingEducation #ComplexSystems #complexity #unpredictability #HumanSecurity #SustainableDevelopment #international #cooperation #networking #UNESCO #WAAS #CHAOS_International_Project

👇💥

🌎👉I share again with pleasure…

“Hyper-technological society? There’s no need for technicians, but for hybrid figures**”

👉 https://www.morningfuture.com/en/article/2018/02/16/job-managers-of-com…

🌎 👉 I would like to take this opportunity to recall that I proposed the concept and operational definition of 'Hybrid Figures' in the mid-1990s (Dominici, 1995-1996).

🍀 Concepts and operational definitions, studies and researches, that have often been 'pointed out' (also in English) and taken up without citations and bibliographical references.

🍀 Concepts and operational definitions are often misinterpreted (👉 e.g. the "hybrid figures" are not "experts in/of everything", as I have been trying to repeat for over twentyfive years, on the contrary!)

An approach and research since 1995

#PeerReviewed

💥👉 “For an Inclusive Innovation. Healing the fracture between the Human and the Technological”

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40309-017-0126-4 Springer Education

💥 👉 “Anthropological Transformation and the “New Nature”, in “World Futures.The Journal of New Paradigm”, Routhledge, Taylor & Francis, Feb. 2022.
 
#PeerReviewed Routhledge

#research #transdisciplinarity #education #AI #FutureofEducation #ComplexSystems #EducationForAll #PeerReviewed
 
👉https://doi.org/10.1080/02604027.2022.2028539  
———

👉 Link to Pdf https://www.academia.edu/71030619/Research_Article_The_Digital_Mockingb…

#EducationForAll #Education #Complexity #SystemsThinking #QuoteTheAuthors #communication #digitalhumanities ‬#UNESCO #FutureofEducation #HybridFigures #ParadigmShift #MentalShift #Transdisciplinarity #FalseDichotomies **

Abdennasser Naji
Abdennasser Naji

I would like to propose you this book “Toward education-based development model” to emphasize the centrality of education and training in the success of any development model aimed at comprehensive and sustainable development in the long run. And successful international experiences confirm this. This book considers that the passage from the current position, at the level of the education and training system, to the desired situation characterized by efficacy and suitability with the rest of the fields, must take place in accordance with a hierarchy consisting of periods governed by the achievement of interim goals whose results for each period are the basis for building the next stage. The education is the key to economic, cultural and social development, and a key factor in developing political practice and moralizing public life. The questions that this book attempts to answer relate mainly to the future of global development and the priorities for its sustainable strengthening, on the basis of international and national scientific studies dealing with the issue of future, in relation to the dominant trends taken by a set of significant indicators in various areas vital the long term. Thus, this book analyses the following questions:
• What are the most important challenges in the future?
• What are its potential implications for public policy?
• What are the priorities of the development model?

Pruszm10
Pruszm10

Foundational learning is crucial to the future prospects of children. Illiteracy at the end of grade 2 has long-term consequences for two reasons. First, learning is cumulative. Education systems around the world expect students to acquire foundational skills such as reading by grades 1 or 2. By grade 3, students need to read to access their curriculum. Students who master these foundational skills early are at an advantage: skills from early grades are strongly positively associated with later school performance. Children who cannot read by grade 3 fall behind and struggle to catch up, perhaps irreparably. Second, schools do not offer struggling students a chance to catch up. In many contexts, the pace of classroom instruction is determined by the need to cover an overly ambitious curriculum rather than by the pace of student learning. This means teachers often have no choice but to ignore students who are falling behind. These students then fall even further behind— eventually so far that no learning whatsoever takes place.
According to the World Bank, 7 out of 10 children in Low and Middle Income Countries cannot read with comprehension by their tenth birthday. In other words, they are functionally illiterate, this after decades of declarations and initiatives by the global education community to improve the quality of basic education. This being the degree zero of our collective aspirations, there is understandably a sense of malaise about the effectiveness of the global education architecture in helping countries address what has been termed the “learning crisis.” In the last many years, the education community has sought to respond to the perceived deficiencies in the architecture in the form of well-intentioned partnerships, specialized financing facilities, commissions, committees, platforms, initiatives, and forums. But these attempts to “fix” the architecture have yet to demonstrate meaningful success: learning levels are persistently low, and positive deviants hard to find.
There is however programming being implemented by national governments in the Global South which is effectively tackling literacy and more importantly reading comprehension.
A new major independent study which finds some of the largest learning gains recorded in international literature - especially among foundation students - should therefore be of enormous interest and relevance as Global Leaders look for ‘solutions at scale’ that can be implemented more broadly.
The study, led by the economist Professor Michael Kremer, a 2019 Nobel Prize winner, finds unequivocal major learning gains across every academic year in NewGlobe-supported schools , compared with other schools.
These are particularly large in the “key grades” for Foundational Literacy and Numeracy (FLN), Grades One and Two.
Kremer and his co-authors found that students in early childhood years supported by NewGlobe received the equivalent of an additional year and a half of learning in two years (1.35 SD).
Practically, the study found that a student in Grade 1 is three times more likely to be able to read when taught using NewGlobe methods. The World Bank estimates that 90% of 10 year olds in Sub-Saharan Africa do not reach this benchmark.
Early Childhood Development is a cost effective intervention with tremendous potential to balance inequities and give the least privileged greater opportunity to succeed in primary school and beyond. Until now, there have been few studies of successful ECD at-scale in low-income countries.

Professor Kremer finds greatest gains in these years. He also records gains in higher order thinking skills of greater than one standard deviation in both of these years.

The learning methods developed by NewGlobe and affirmed so clearly in the Kremer study are the same ones used to underpin NewGlobe’s support for government-led public education programs across Africa and South Asia, with one million students in public schools now benefiting from them.
The substantial gains in foundational learning supported by these structured methods are clear and should be strongly endorsed at the Transforming Education Summit (TES), especially given the crisis in learning outcomes currently being faced in so many countries.

Adv. Jean-Philippe Rubin
Adv. Jean-Philippe Rubin

In the framework of the Transforming Education Summit 2022 convened by the United Nations Secretary-General, we propose a Universal Statement of Commitment that outlines a bold vision and concrete actions for the transformation of education to drive progress towards the SDGs and better prepare learners for the future.
We seek to reflect a whole-of society vision of the transformation of education systems and key levers of change that can bring about this vision.
1. GIVING OUR BEST
2. PERSONAL EXAMPLE
3. MARITAL HARMONY
4. GRATITUDE AND JOY
5. FOCUS ON THE GOOD
6. FIRST PRIORITY
7. THE POWER OF LOVE
8. NO PRESSURE
9. THE WAY TO THE HEART
10. TO LIVE AND GIVE LIFE
11. TASK OF THE TEACHER
12. CLIMBING THE FENCES
Enclosed is the full version.
Your comments would be highly appreciated.
Best regards.
Adv. Jean-Philippe Rubin, international lawyer and journalist

Thaís Lacerda Queiroz Carvalho
Thaís Lacerda Queiroz Carvalho

Call to add the Scout Movement at the list of "Key initiatives, coalitions, networks and platforms":

Scouting (link: https://scout.org/) is a global youth Movement that builds friendships, experiences, and skills for life, shaping young people's futures as active citizens. More than 500 million young people and adults have joined and experienced the power of Scouting's non-formal education since it was founded in 1907. Since then, the Scout Movement has continued to grow and is now active in 172 National Scout Organizations. Today, over 57 million young people, supported by millions of dedicated volunteers, take part in Scouting activities and events worldwide. Scouting education enables young people to be self-fulfilled, inspired, action-oriented, and committed to a life of purpose. Scouting is rooted in the transformative ideals of equality, inclusivity, mutual respect, sustainability, harmony, and optimism for the future.

Sasa Madacki
Sasa Madacki

Call for strengthening non-formal education: Statement of Schüler Helfen Leben Foundation

According to the Global Risk Report 2022 by the World Economic Forum , Social cohesion erosion is the risk that has worsened the most globally since the start of the COVID-19 crisis. It is perceived as a critical threat to the world across all periods—short, medium, and long term—and is believed to be among the most potentially damaging for the next ten years. This situation leads to a loss of social capital and the fracturing of social networks negatively impacting social stability and individual well-being resulting in public anger, distrust, divisiveness, lack of empathy, marginalization of minorities and political polarization.

As a part of the solution, the strengthening of non-formal education can contribute to creating exemplary young people who are educated and empowered to be the ambassadors of sustainable change in society, promoting human rights values. Achieving excellence and truly empowered remarkable youth requires focusing not only on knowledge but also on developing personal integrity, merits and confidence. A good (read: resilient) activist is driven by people’s needs, has a vision, ethical principles, and social commitment, and is oriented towards the future. Besides being knowledgeable, a good agent of change should aim to be empathic, respectful, trustworthy, hardworking, self-confident, independent, and well-networked. Aware that being a leader is not a title awarded but deserved through hard work, engagement, and commitment, we see non-formal education as a stepping-stone for young people who will seek out leadership roles and actively contribute to the development of society.

Therefore, we call for introducing and strengthening civic engagement non-formal education programs aimed at empowering young people because we believe that only empowered and socially aware young people are to be true agents of change in combatting the multiple global crises to come. We believe that the prevention of social cohesion erosion is only possible by joint action of global youth.
In order to reach as much young people aiming to be agents of change in society as possible, we call for more targeted and better structured intensive funding of non-formal education through United Nations agencies since coordinated global action is essential to activate youth on grass-root levels.

Thabiso  Monageng
Thabiso Monageng

Botswana-
Students shall have a Job Shadowing program, this is like window shopping the kind of career path you aspire to follow.
Also private educational institutions with enough resources in laboratories and practical learning should collaborate with governments to assist and adopt schools with less resources.
Education curriculums need amendments to suit the current global demands, most systems are still based on adopted colonial topics not relevant or local markets. eg. In Botswana where students still learn of early civilization and history of countries they may never interact with instead of maybe their local industries, features or raw materials. This education system creates skills mismatch.

Mapaseka  Inama
Mapaseka Inama

I totally agree with this as now it has come to a point where some courses in varsity are deemed to be not of use in helping the economy ,so my question is why such course still being made available .I believe they should be discontinued. As when we have completed our studies we have challenges finding employment. They only provide us with theory work which makes us unqualified and unskilled for the workplace hence finding challenges in finding employment as students are coming fresh from the university with no experience. I believe that program could be of great assistance especially if it can be started final year or even after graduation

mvandervelde
mvandervelde

Thank you for providing this space to share ideas about transforming education. At Educate!, (https://www.experienceeducate.org/) we focus on preparing youth in East Africa with the skills to succeed in today’s economy, which is largely within the informal sector. Our core experience delivers essential skills young people need to transition to work, combining skills courses, mentorship, and practical experience starting a business. We deliver this experience in three ways: directly in schools, through government integration, and to youth unable to access formal education.

Some key aspects of our work include the following:

-Evidence-based models: We've tested our core experience through multiple randomized evaluations and found that participants see significant improvements in skills, educational attainment, business creation, and gender equity outcomes.
-Solutions aligned to youth needs: We center young people within the development of our models and build peer and community networks to provide ongoing support.
-A strong foundation of soft skills: In addition to job-specific skills, we equip young people with the transferable skills that ultimately allow them to thrive in an ever-changing world of work.
-Gender-responsive practices and equitable access: We work to address the root causes of gender inequity at the individual, institutional, community, and governmental levels.
-Sustainable and cost-effective solutions: We aim to reach a large number of youth at a low cost by delivering our model through existing structures, engaging exceptional participants as mentors, and implementing innovative design strategies.

Ultimately, we aim to support youth in building the competencies and mindsets to better their life outcomes and pursue their goals in any setting. We look forward to continuing the conversation!

Roeland Monasch
Roeland Monasch

Thank you for sharing the Thematic Action Track 2: learning and skills for life, work, and sustainable development and providing the opportunity to provide input. It is much appreciated.

I have read the position paper with great interest. However, it begs the question if this Transforming Education Summit Action Track 2 position paper and its recommendations ensure that we disrupt the status quo of education systems worldwide and transform them in accordance with the expanded view of education laid out in SDG 4?

To contribute to the discussion, I have listed 5 questions that might require some more discussion as we jointly articulate a clear position on what transforming education actually means for learning and skills for life, work, and sustainable development.

1-SHOULD “EDUCATION FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT” BE THE GUIDING FRAMEWORK FOR THE THEMATIC ACTION TRACK 2?

The position paper refers to the “Education for Sustainable Development: towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (ESD for 2030)” and the “Berlin Declaration on Education for Sustainable Development” as the framework for Thematic Action Track 2. The paper relies also on the UNESCO-led ‘’Education for Sustainable Development: A Roadmap”.

Over the past decades, ESD has been a loose concept meaning different things to different people. During the United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (2005-2014) [see: https://en.unesco.org/themes/education-sustainable-development/what-is-…] progress stayed far behind from what was envisaged. During the ESD Decade stakeholders even agreed that there was no common definition (or need) of what ESD means - see: https://open.spotify.com/episode/6xiUJzx25vQe3G4jxXNFVq?si=3deb07208fee…].

The new position paper recognizes that despite all efforts there are “major shortcomings regarding the extent and depth of education for sustainable development (ESD) in educational plans and curricula today”.

Yet, there seems very little new proposed - Recommendation 2 in the new draft position paper is ‘the launching of ESD for 2030 country initiative(s)’. Followed by recommendation 3, which is calling for ‘strengthening ESD networks at local, national, regional, and global levels’. So, continuing to advocate for the same that didn’t get traction over the past 3-4 decades. Why would it work this time? Isn’t there a very high risk to continuing ‘business as usual’?

Are there any lessons learnt from the last 3-4 decades that have been seriously considered? – Why there are these “major shortcomings” despite all the efforts so far? How do we ensure broad systematic buy-in this time, and ensure the leadership of ESD at global & regional levels that can guarantee we don’t continue the ‘everything and nothing’ approach? (It is not a secret that SDG 4.7 is regarded as the kitchen sink of everything that didn’t fit in a specific SDG education goal. [see: https://open.spotify.com/episode/6xiUJzx25vQe3G4jxXNFVq?si=3deb07208fee…].)

2-SHOULD WE IDENTIFY MORE SPECIFIC UNIVERSAL (21ST CENTURY) COMPETENCIES & SKILLS (OR AT LEAST AT THE REGIONAL LEVEL)?

The draft position paper refers in recommendation 4 to a set of specific (universal?) skills. Aside from ‘the ability to read with understanding, do basic maths, and master appropriate socio-emotional skills by age 10’, it recommends ‘digital skills, transferable competencies for sustainability and entrepreneurship mindsets and skills’ to be embedded in learning goals, curricula and programmes.
Should we be more specific on what ‘transferable competencies for sustainability and entrepreneurship mindsets and skills’ means? – Are we not at risk that again is too vague and having different meanings for different constituencies? – SEE BONUS QUESTION BELOW.

The paper also lists a limited number of competencies . They are presented in a non-directive way recognizing probably that competencies and skills can be culturally different and the prioritization of skills/competencies can vary. Being culturally appropriate and inclusive is important, but if this leads to the risk to continue the ambiguity and a ‘free for all’. Should we consider a set of universal 21st-century skills/competencies that are required in any setting (like reading and counting)? And which should these be?

Can we learn from experiences like the Life Skills and Citizenship Education initiative in the Middle East & North Africa region? In recent years representatives from governmental institutions (Ministries of Education, Youth, Social Affairs and Labour), UN Agencies, think tanks and universities, NGOs, the private sector, and children and youth in the MENA region identified and agreed on a set of 12 core life skills (evidence-based) [see: https://www.unicef.org/mena/reports/reimagining-life-skills-and-citizen…]. Should we develop something at the global level or for all regions specific skills?

3-‘CLIMATE CHANGE EDUCATION’ OR ‘RESPONSIBLE RESOURCE MANAGEMENT EDUCATION’?

The paper has a strong focus on climate change, the environment & sustainability education. The first recommendation highlights the need for climate change education in curriculum at all levels. What does that exactly entail? Are we not a risk to have an issue-based focus and think too narrow? Should the focus not rather be on a broader ‘Responsible Resource Management’ (water, waste management, environment, finances, recycling etc. and how to act on the accompanying employment/entrepreneurship opportunities)? – See BONUS QUESTION BELOW.

4-THE PAPER SINGLES OUT TVET CONSISTENTLY WHEN THERE IS A REFERENCE TO SKILLS FOR EMPLOYMENT AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP – SHOULD THAT BE THE CASE? WHAT ABOUT THE YOUNGER AGE GROUPS (PRIMARY, LOWER-SECONDARY), ESPECIALLY THOSE WHO WILL NEVER HAVE THE LUXURY TO ADVANCE TO THE TVET STAGE AS THEY HAVE ALREADY DROPPED OUT OF SCHOOL?

The draft position paper emphasizes a strong link between TVET and entrepreneurship skills. “Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) and skills development have a central role to play in ensuring the achievement of these goals”. The reality is however that less than 15% of upper secondary education students are in TVET in low and lower-middle-income countries. Thus, the large majority of young people will never attend TVET. Even when we use the broader definition in the position paper many children/students will need to be exposed at a much earlier age to these essential skills before their education is disrupted. Many young learners today will not graduate, will not get a diploma and even fewer will get a job in the private or public sector. The majority will become (survival) entrepreneurs. Skills for employment and entrepreneurship are essential to improve income-generation abilities among the most vulnerable learners. That brings me again to the BONUS QUESTION BELOW.

5-ARE THE RECOMMENDATIONS ADEQUATELY ACTION ORIENTED/RESULTS DRIVEN?

The current recommendations seem to be very much the same as they were in 1974 , as they were during the United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (2005-2014) [see: https://en.unesco.org/themes/education-sustainable-development/what-is-…] and the 2020 ‘’Education for Sustainable Development: A Roadmap”.

Are the recommendations in the draft position paper CLEAR, PRACTICAL, ACTIONABLE, UNIVERSAL, MEASURABLE & ACCOUNTABLE? Do they plainly state how we will ensure all students gain the so much-needed 21st century skills (incl. which skills, how teachers are capacitated and how the competencies should be assessed? etc.).

For example, Recommendation 16 reads currently: “Commit to the data collection and monitoring of progress, including, among others, the periodic reporting on the UNESCO 1974 recommendation; the 2015 Recommendation on TVET; and the development of stronger monitoring systems for measuring progress in foundational skills”. Does this recommendation in the new position paper indicate that the Transforming Education Summit will ensure that we disrupt the status quo of education systems worldwide and transform them? Should we be concerned?

Having worked for more than 20 years for the United Nations I understand the strengths and weaknesses of the multilateral processes, the challenges of international negotiations and the importance of a position paper that has international consensus. But I feel responsible to put this question in front of all of us interested in transforming education:
Does this Transforming Education Summit Action Track 2 position paper and its recommendations ensure that we disrupt the status quo of education systems worldwide and transform them in accordance with the expanded view of education laid out in SDG 4?

BONUS QUESTION: WHY IS THERE NOTHING ON FINANCIAL LITERACY/FINANCIAL EDUCATION?

Finally, my bonus question. I will be open and honest about this – I have a personal interest as CEO of Aflatoun – Social, Financial & Entrepreneurship Education. But if you read the question you will understand why and why you should be asking the question too.

The new State of the Global Learning Poverty: 2022 Update expresses “deep concerns about the reduction of productivity and earnings of today’s children once they enter the workforce” [see: https://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/education/publication/state-of-globa…]. The Current Transforming Education draft position paper states in its opening paragraph that “transforming education means empowering learners with the knowledge, skills, values, and attitudes to be resilient, adaptable, and prepared for an uncertain and complex future”. It highlights that “all learners should be empowered with the knowledge, skills, values and attitudes required to address individual, economic and societal demands”.

The Sustainable Development Goals are integrated and indivisible and balance the three dimensions of sustainable development: the economic, social and environmental [see: https://www.un.org/en/content/common-agenda-report/assets/pdf/Common_Ag…]. The overall central focus of the position paper therefore is “on empowering individuals as agents of change to lead the twin transitions towards digital and green economies”. The position paper talks about climate skills, and digital skills, but there is no mention of Financial Literacy in the entire document. How can we expect future generations to be agents of change in transitioning economies if we don’t transition their education so learners understand the day-to-day realities they live in, which centres to a large extent – if we like it or not - around the use of (financial) resources (=read money)…?

The position paper states that the “ultimate purpose of education is to prepare us for life – to understand how to organize our lives and how to relate with other human beings and nature”. How can we expect the next generation to organize their lives if they don’t understand money? There is an assumption that children learn about finances from their parents. But many children live in poverty because their parents don’t understand money.

The Transforming Education document is at risk to be paternalistic – It has a strong focus on ensuring inclusion, equity, and justice stating that “the vulnerable often have the least resources and access to information that will enable them to adapt to the impact of climate change”. The document also calls for the “establishment of equity-based, pro-poor budget allocations so that education expenditures serve to reduce inequities and are efficiently linked with strengthened social protection schemes for learners”. But there is no reference to educating the vulnerable on how to manage financial resources so they can take control of their own lives.

The 2018 PISA found that large proportions of students age 15 in non-OECD countries are financially illiterate – don’t understand the basics of money [see: https://www.oecd.org/education/pisa-2018-results-volume-iv-48ebd1ba-en…].

Recent independent academic researchers have confirmed the power of Financial Education. A review of 76 randomized control trials found that “the effects of the financial education interventions on financial knowledge are comparable to interventions designed to improve math and reading scores” [see: Financial Education Matters: Testing the Effectiveness of Financial Education Across 76 Randomized Experiments - https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0304405X21004281].

Furthermore, researchers also recently found that “combining financial education and sexual and reproductive health education with self-efficacy (social education) is associated with positive health and economic outcomes for vulnerable youth and children in low and middle-income countries” [see: Financial education for HIV-vulnerable youth, orphans, and vulnerable children: A systematic review of outcome evidence - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/cl2.1071].

The often heard argument – ‘we can’t list everything’ is not a valid one anymore. The draft Position Paper does talk about Comprehensive Sexuality Education as it is considered one of the major successes in recent years. Let’s make sure we start talking about Financial Education as it will be a key component of any successful transformed education system that prioritizes Learning and Skills for Life, Work, and Sustainable Development!

Are the recommendations in the position paper really going to transform the education systems we want which will ensure --> Learning and Skills for Life, Work, and Sustainable Development for all learners?

Roeland Monasch
CEO – Aflatoun International
[email protected]

Marie
Marie

For true change to happen, it’s important that we equip learners with human and planetary sustainability educational programs. What are tools we can use to empower learners with the knowledge, skills, values and actions on sustainability to enhance their awareness of SDGs?

Roeland Monasch
Roeland Monasch

Hi Marie - Fully agree - I guess there needs to be a ‘Responsible Resource Management’ (climate, water, waste management, environment, finances, recycling etc. and how to act on the accompanying employment/entrepreneurship opportunities)?

Dr Wesam Al Madhoun
Dr Wesam Al Madhoun

Greetings
I hope you are well.

I would like to invite you to the Global Ambassadors of Sustainability (GAoS) , which is an international initiative of 13000 members from 130 countries.
https://gsdevelopment.org

GAoS partners with UNESCO, UN Habitat and American University of Dubai, to boost Sustainability practices, Climate action and International Partnerships.

GAoS Focus and Contribute to the SDG's 4,5,16 and 17.

Kindly claim your Membership Certificate using the following Link : https://forms.gle/T7A3bqkSumrzyeQt6

Welcome To Join:
LinkedIn:
https://www.linkedin.com/company/global-ambassadors-of-sustainability

Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/3746720922023120

Instagram
https://www.instagram.com/gaos202022/

Lets Create a Greater Global Impact Together.
Regards
--
Dr. Wesam Al Madhoun
Founder-Global Ambassadors of Sustainability

Co-Founder-Middle East SDG's Academy

https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-wesam-al-madhoun-4085863/

Paul HERVE
Paul HERVE

Le secteur de l'éducation en Afrique est le plus touché par les conflits, crise économique et sécuritaire, changement climatique et d'autres crises interdépendantes, quoi qu'il en soit, l'éducation est un outil essentiel et incontournable. Parce que c'est le principal outil qui nous permet de sauvegarder notre histoire, nos cultures, notre devoir de bons citoyens et notre avenir etc. Les conditions applicables à notre éducation en considération sont les plus terrifiantes qui soient au XXIe Siècle. Promouvoir une bonne gouvernance et une tarification efficace dans l'éducation peut nous aider à éviter les conséquences durables causées par les conflits et les crises. En mettant l'accent sur la reprise immédiate des résolutions et de législation.

Selon l'organisme spécialisés de PACO d'EDUCAF PACO, l'absence de réponse des pouvoirs publics en particulier les gouvernements africains et des institutions intergouvernementales africaine est un défi pour atteindre l'immunité collective d'ici 2030 ou d'ici 2063.

Thématique 1 Forum de discussion sur les écoles inclusives, équitables, sûres et saines
L'équipe TES
L'équipe TES
• 11 mai 2022

l'initiative de créer une assurance éducation jusqu'à l'âge de 18 ans cadre avec le principe directeur de la Thématique 1. Le projet de création d'une assurance éducation s'aligne avec l'ODD 4 et l'AGENDA 2063 et promet un impact positif sur le plan international de base sur les écoles inclusives, équitables, sûres et saines d'ici 2030, 2050 et 2063.

Conformément à ce qui précède nous recommandons de mettre l'accent sur l'innovation d'une assurance éducation comme outil de garantir de l'éducation de qualité.

https://www.linkedin.com/posts/pan-africain-consortium_urgent-le-secteu…

Seema69_28
Seema69_28

Wide range of strategies to recover lost learning, bridge the digital divide , make education inclusive and transformative has to be prioritized as a national policy imperative and a global common good.

Seema69_28
Seema69_28

We must be better prepared for the next crisis – and the SDGs are the answer. They must be central to all recovery plans. If the pandemic teaches us anything, it is that we must be better prepared for the next crisis. In sustainability and climate terms, the SDGs provide as clear a template for global action as we will ever have. They can and must be central to all recovery plans. This is especially the case in the education sector!
AS suggested by Divine community-based learning ( SDG related projects) can be used as a scalable and innovative pedagogic approach that combines learning objectives with community service in order to provide a progressive learning experience while meeting societal and environmental needs.

Alice Pfennig
Alice Pfennig

At the heart of everything we do as educators is producing students who are genuinely able to think in a critical way. This means helping young people to develop the skills, the courage, and the inclination to challenge, rather than confirm their own assumptions and biases, and apply this to contemporary events and issues. This is a lifelong skill that enables future leaders to make decisions the right way. If we can achieve this, we can change the world!

Seema69_28
Seema69_28

Skills Friendly Cities are working to build more equitable and effective skills enabling environments for young people, at the local level, alongside the business community, education institutions and youth. They strive for conditions and collaboration among actors to positively impact a young person’s ability to acquire relevant skills or a quality job. A skills friendly city fully cultivates a collaborative ecosystem for young people ages 15-25 encompassing (1) education and training; (2) public policies and public sector efforts; (3) employers; (4) connections and matchmaking between jobseekers and employers; (5) funding and investment from public, private and other actors.
A network and collaboration of all stakeholders is required to bring about such a change at scale at all levels. Be it academia, universities, schools, businesses, civil society and Governments at local, regional and national level

James Prideaux
James Prideaux

Hi Seema,
I'd love to find out more about Skills Friendly Cities and maybe share some of the work Skills Builder Partnership are doing too. Would you be up for an online coffee and chat?
Thanks!
James

Divine Foretia
Divine Foretia

To my opinion, If we truly want to transform our present education system, it is very important we start exploring and adopting new emerging trends and approaches to curriculum development and pedagogy especially those that deliver meaningful outcomes. Service learning or community-based learning for example, is a pragmatic, scalable and innovative pedagogic approach that combines learning objectives with community service in order to provide a progressive learning experience while meeting societal needs. Service learning, falls at the intersection of practical experience, community involvement, and academic study. Students apply the structured knowledge and skills acquired in the academic course while developing a project that deals with a specific social problem while working in a team. There many examples of good practice around the world.

Neela Majumdar
Neela Majumdar

EARTHDAY.ORG firmly believes that the key to Earth’s future lies in environmental learning opportunities for youths of all ages and backgrounds to develop them into informed stewards of the environment. Considering the grim conclusions presented by the 2021 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which prompted the UN Secretary General to announce a “Code Red for Humanity”, we appeal to every country to put in place academic systems that lead youth to climate stewardship and action for the environment. This necessitates making climate education compulsory from Kindergarten to Class XII and providing an enabling environment for climate literacy to grow in our future generations. Such initiatives will also enhance their skills needed to benefit from job openings in the rapidly expanding green economy: those to conserve our natural wealth, reduce air, water and land pollution, manage waste, and foster a shift to renewable sources of energy. Our ebook Climate Literacy: Beyond the Written Word is available online on earthday.org as a resource for teachers and students: https://www.earthday.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/EDN_eBook-Climate-L…

Roeland Monasch
Roeland Monasch

Indeed - Thank you - Climate action education is very important, but not in isolation - It will need to have different elements of ‘Responsible Resource Management Skills’ (climate, water, waste management, environment, managing finances responsibly, recycling etc. and how to act on the accompanying employment/entrepreneurship opportunities)?

Muhammad Raqim
Muhammad Raqim

Hello Everyone...
I would like to share my idea about transforming and changing education for our new generation.We should start teaching skills at University level instead of teaching only theory.Universities must taught skills and involve students into practice of these skills to make them fully professional at the time of graduation. It will allow companies to incorporate fresh graduate students immediately into the workplace and this step will ensure the sustainable and successful future career of students and countries.We must take students into practical experience of skills and tell them about the importance of skilled person and it's abilities of doing work.

James Prideaux
James Prideaux

Hi Muhammad,
We at Skills Builder are running a pilot with some universities in the UK, looking at their engagement with our Universal Framework: https://www.skillsbuilder.org/universal-framework. We are looking to grow the pilot further in the next academic year but I'm sure there will be some really useful insights gathered that we could share. I would also check out our 2022 Essential Skills Tracker - https://www.skillsbuilder.org/tracker-2022 - which surveyed individuals in the UK aged 18-65 to look at what the relationship is between essential skills and life outcomes such as employment and wellbeing.
Thanks
James

Karuna Singh
Karuna Singh

It is all the more imperative then that youth understand how anthropogenic actions harm the environment and them. I’m afraid that by the time we have finished debating ‘should we or should we not demand mandating Climate Education’ it might be too late. The time is now. Your support please for demanding it from governments. Take the Maldives for example. A little more sea level rise and the country might go under. Yet not enough emphasis is placed on climate education.

Seema69_28
Seema69_28

Increasing climate impacts on education: Climate change and ecosystem destabilization will introduce new challenges to ensuring the right to education, for example through teacher and student displacement, damage to school buildings, food insecurity, disease, and poverty, especially for the most vulnerable. The above examples further emphasises the need to introduce ESD/CCE as early as possible.

Karuna Singh
Karuna Singh

Our President Kathleen Rogers will be there as well as other colleagues. Ms Rogers will share how youth are taking the lead to project the need for mandatory climate education that widens opportunities for climate literacy so that youth take on the mantle of climate stewardship from a young age. This need is evidenced by youth leaders privileged to be climate literate. Many of them are part of our MyFutureMyVoice global initiative. We call upon all to support EARThDAY.ORG’s petition to have governments mandate climate education in all countries.

Kathleen Rogers
Kathleen Rogers

We have attracted over four hundred million signatures to a petition calling for mandatory, fully integrated climate literacy education, civic skill building, and jobs training so that everyone can participate in the creation of an equitable green economy. Our supporters include organizations, including teachers' union, labor unions, faith groups, mayors, corporations, including Microsoft, and NGOs along with individuals across the planet. A final document that does not explicitly include these issues will not prepare our students for the impacts and opportunities presented by the climate crisis.

Matthew Aruch
Matthew Aruch

Thematic Action Track 2: Learning and Skills for Life, Work, and Sustainable Development
Mentioned 22 times in the discussion paper, action track 2 makes explicit the need to “empower learners with knowledge, skills, values, and attitudes to be resilient, adaptable, and prepared for an uncertain, complex future while actively and creatively contributing to human and planetary well-being and sustainable societies” (p. 1). Environmental and climate change education are specifically noted as one of the three key issues in the action track along with foundational learning and entrepreneurship.

Climate Change Education (CCE) overlaps with the foundational learning skills and mindsets required for literacy and numeracy. We argue CCE is an appropriate vehicle for meeting the vision of the Commission on the Future of Education to emphasize ecological, social, and emotional, intercultural, interdisciplinary, and intergenerational learning to foster global citizenship, the rule of law, mutual trust, and global solidarity… [for a] wide range of cognitive, socio-emotional, and behavioral skills needed in a fast changing and still largely unequal world (p.4). We encourage summit organizers to consider the ways in which climate change and climate literacy cut across the key issue areas of action track 2.

The summit must name climate change as the main issue underpinning the sustainable development action track, highlighting the opportunity for inclusive participation in the green economy of the future.

Roeland Monasch
Roeland Monasch

CCE is indeed a priority Matthew - In order to avoid the risk of making it too much an issue-based education approach, it would be good to approach it from a broader skills perspective - Responsible Resource Management

Jacqueline Léa Biloa AHANDA
Jacqueline Léa Biloa AHANDA

Merci de nous donner l'opportunité de partager nos idées sur la thématique. Cette thématique est très intéressante surtout pour nous enfants, adolescents et jeunes.
1. Les systèmes éducatifs ne sont pas les mêmes dans tous les pays surtout au niveau local. Au Cameroun par exemple il a subit d'autres coups avec la pandémie. Imaginer un enfant qui est forcé de quitter des kilomètres ou aller vers un autre village pour se faire former, avec le Covid l'école s'est arrêté un moment et les cours en ligne/radio/télé ont été programmés pour la poursuite des formations et cet enfant est situé dans un village qui n'a pas de réseau, pas de radio, ni télé. Alors il perd une année scolaire ainsi à cause de sa situation. Je pense qu'il faut adapter l'apprentissage en fonction des réalités locales. Certes l'éducation mondiale est instituée mais faut tenir compte des réalités locales.
2. La formation technique doit commencer à la base. C'est pas au collège ou lycée que l'on doit apprendre son métier de demain. C'est vers le bas âge que l'on doit inculqué l'esprit professionnel et/ou entrepreneurial pour que l'enfant en grandissant puisse s'adapter aux défis de la mondialisation et pouvoir réussir.
3. Créer au niveau régional et national des Comités de coordination et de suivi des plans d'actions élaborés au niveau international en faisant intervenir toutes les parties prenantes les apprenants, les enseignants, les parents, les leaders traditionnels et religieux, les OSC, les PTF, les secteurs privés, les acteurs gouvernementaux etc.

Merci

Delphine  Poschmann
Delphine Poschmann

Thank you for allowing us to comment and great to connect with this group to share ideas and thoughts. We at United World Colleges (UWC) look forward to contributing to the discussion. We are a global non-profit educational movement whose mission is to make education a force to unite people, nations and cultures for peace and a sustainable future. We deliver a transformational educational experience to a diverse student body, inspiring them to create a more peaceful and sustainable future. To start, we want to share some guiding principles that are key to us when talking about transforming education for better skills acquisition:
1. Education should occur within a diverse community of people from a wide range of cultural contexts and varying socio-economic backgrounds.
2. Education requires the active promotion of intercultural understanding and the development of genuine concern for others, founded on shared life experiences and cooperative and collaborative living. This includes talking about and engaging with global issues in the pursuit of peace.
3. International/global education should become relevant where needed but cannot be afforded.
4. Community interaction is essential and shall be at the heart of school life, where all school members are encouraged to cooperate across barriers of all kinds.
5. Education shall encourage students to develop an entrepreneurial mindset and a responsibility to act.
6. Students have the potential to take ownership, or agency, of their learning and must have opportunities to practice personal initiative, self-discipline and responsibility.
7. Experiential learning - the process of making meaning from direct experience - is fundamental.

Tadashi Nagai
Tadashi Nagai

As a response to common crises facing humankind, we could suggest more concrete commitment to transforming education toward 2030 and beyond in the form of a "plan of action." In the sense, I think we should never forget the necessity of always bringing back to the mission of education which can present happiness of all children. This is something ethical I would like to put emphasis on in the paper.
Also, partnerships among multi stakeholders would be necessary for transforming education. Unless various NGOs, educators, governments and municipalities, and so forth, get together to make synergies, it would not be easy to transform education.

Seema69_28
Seema69_28

For the Feedback, to the Draft we can clearly see the weightage being given to Education for Sustainable Development( ESD) and GCED. To achieve the Target of 2030 related to the Global goals it is very important that ESD is accepted as an Universal education and Curriculum based on 17 SDG’s in the K-12 , TVET and Teacher education and Higher Education programs.

Tadashi Nagai
Tadashi Nagai

For the feedback to the drafted discussion paper, as we can see, it places the Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) in the center of the contexts. In terms of integrating quality education and value education globally, I think the Global Citizenship Education (GCED) could be mentioned in the paper. Both GCED and ESD are adapted as global education agenda in the SDGs 4.7 and these are two pillars of the target to achieve.

Tadashi Nagai
Tadashi Nagai

Thank you for giving us this opportunity to share ideas on transforming education. In terms of lifelong learning to ensure that all individuals have chance to learn, we hope that non-formal education and in-formal education will be a key to playing a big role in ESD and global citizenship education (GCED). Not only school but also community and NGOs could provide the opportunities to learn with youth and children. The partnership among stakeholders working for education will be more important than ever before so that no children and youth can be left behind.


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